Richard Wagner ist Leipziger - Leipzig Tourismus und Marketing GmbH

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Date: 07.12.2016

The Zum Arabischen Coffee Baum | Richard Wagner ist Leipziger - Leipzig Tourismus und Marketing GmbH

 

 
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The Zum Arabischen Coffee Baum

The young Richard Wagner 1813 - 1834

 
 
 
 
The “Coffee Baum” was built in 1556 and is one of Germany’s oldest coffee houses. A drastic renovation and new construction of the building was carried out in 1703. In 1717 the Electoral Saxon and Royal Polish court chocolatier, Johann Lehmann, took possession of the house and had it converted into a lavish coffeehouse in 1718/19. The central axis of the facade was accentuated with sandstone jambs, two baroque window gables and a scenic sculpture above the entrance.

Robert Schumann often visited the Coffee Baum from 1833 until 1840 to discuss his “Neue Zeitschrift für Musik” within the circle of the so-called “Davidsbündler”. The society was led by Robert Schumann and consisted above all of young musicians who were dissatisfied with the situation in Germany as far as music was concerned. Although Wagner did not participate in the round table discussions in the Coffee Baum, he was acquainted with Robert Schumann and other “Davidsbündler”. In 1834, articles written by Richard Wagner appeared in issues No. 63 (6th November) and 64 (10th November) of the “Neue Zeitschrift für Musik” under the pseudonym Canto Spinato.
 
 
“Walkers that climb the Barfußberg hill from the mall through the small Barfuß gate are captivated, now as ever, by Kleine Fleischergasse 4, a modest house favourably adorned with baroque architecture in the central axis only. In particular, the portal with its high-relief catches the eye. It shows a Turk, sprawled out above the door, handing a cup to a naked boy. Next to him stands an already poured jug; between the Turk and the child there is a tree, divided completely symmetrically, the central axis insinuated above and below. The sculpture is explained by the inscription in the finishing curve fixed above: Zum Arabischen Coffee Baum”.

Lange, Walter: Richard Wagner und seine Vaterstadt Leipzig, C.G.W. Siegel‘s Musikalienhandlung (R. Linnemann), Leipzig, 1921, p. 87.
 
 
“I had already known Schumann in Leipzig, and we had both entered upon our musical careers at about the same time. I had also occasionally sent small contributions to the “Neue Zeitschrift fur Musik”, of which he had formerly been editor, and more recently a longer one from Paris on Rossini's Stabat Mater”.

Richard Wagner: My Life. Volume 1. Dietrich‘sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, Leipzig, 1958, p. 518.
 
Baroque portal sculpture at the “Coffee Baum”, presumably by Bildhauer Bejamin Thomae from Dresden, 1719.
Baroque portal sculpture at the “Coffee Baum”, presumably by Bildhauer Bejamin Thomae from Dresden, 1719.
 
The “Zum Coffee Baum” coffeehouse, as it appears today. The colourfulness of the facade reflects Richard Wagner’s time in Leipzig. - Richard ist Leipziger - Ein Leipziger  (Quelle: Kulturstiftung Leipzig)
The “Zum Coffee Baum” coffeehouse, as it appears today. The colourfulness of the facade reflects Richard Wagner’s time in Leipzig.
 
The “Schumannecke” in its current state - Richard ist Leipziger - Ein Leipziger  (Quelle: Kulturstiftung Leipzig)
The “Schumannecke” in its current state
 
 
 
Source: Ein Leipziger (Leipzig Cultural Foundation)